Leadership and Courage

I recently wrote, “One of the key elements of accountability is the comfort to have the ‘right’ conversations. Being accountable is addressing all issues and providing feedback for positive behaviours also. This is not something that we pick and choose depending on our own levels of comfort or fear. You are either all in or you are out! Strong relationships with high trust allow us to have the right conversations. In all of our relationships, both inside and outside of the workplace, we earn the right to hold others accountable. A surface level conversation once every few months will never cut it. I believe there is no conversation that cannot be had – with the caveat that it is what happens in between the formal discussions that enables us to ‘go there’.”

Gwyn Teatro often writes blogs of substance and relevance, with her most recent revisited offering spot on in terms of the reality of organisational culture and the various challenges that exist in most businesses.

The real decision is whether you are the sort of leader who is willing to develop deep relationships, be accountable and be brave enough to challenge the norms, not because it is easy, but because to not do so does not sit comfortably with your own values and beliefs. I share this blog as another great example of Gwyn’s thoughts and the extension of my own.

You're Not the Boss of Me

courageCourage has many faces. It doesn’t always show up complete with epaulets and a shiny sword yelling “Charge!!” In fact, I would suggest it more often demands a much subtler approach. Either way, courage is not something we can buy or fake. It lives in the heart of our character. And, it is something we hope to have enough of when we need it most.

Brave leaders go first and inspire others to find their own courage. They defy convention. They admit their mistakes, apologize and make amends when they are wrong. Brave leaders explore unknown territory in service of something greater than themselves. They deliver bad news with clarity, determination and compassion. And, they stay the course when the going gets tough

Brave leaders, too, frequently look in their personal, and organizational mirrors to find something in themselves or in the systems they create that works against their potential…

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